Morton’s Neuroma is Capable of Sidelining Tennis Pros and Amateurs Alike

Can You Treat Morton’s Neuromas with a Trip to the Massage Parlor?Many international tennis fans were saddened to learn about Milos Raonic. In the week before Memorial Day 2015, the 24-year-old, Canadian tennis player found himself in an unfortunate situation. The source of his consternation was an ongoing foot injury.

For those that may have missed the sports headlines, he had Morton’s neuroma. The tennis pro tried surgical intervention to correct the problem but has yet to fully recover.

For many people who undergo a neurectomy, the post-surgery recovery period typically takes six weeks. By all media accounts, the tennis pro opted to have his surgery in early May. So, it is no wonder that he was unable to resume his frenetic pace in time for the start of Roland Garros tournament. At this point, he’s shooting for a return to the courts in late June and we hope that he makes it.

Morton’s neuroma is a common ailment that befalls pro tennis players and amateurs alike. It is brought about by a number of things, including playing on tennis courts for extended periods of time in athletic shoes that have certain types of toe boxes and little padding. The toe boxes compress the tennis player’s foot and a lack of padding doesn’t help matters either. As a result, one of the nerves in the foot becomes pinched.

Once pinched, the nerve becomes grossly irritated and misshapen. It also worsens over time if not treated effectively with one or more of the following:

  • Cortisone Injections and Oral Non-Steroidal Drugs
  • Modified Athletic Shoes and Supplemental Padding
  • Custom Orthotics for Tennis Players
  • Ice Pack Therapy and Activity Restrictions

Raonic allegedly began showing signs of his discomfort as early as April 2015. So he clearly wasted no time in receiving expert care from a podiatrist. Unfortunately for him, his case required surgical intervention. To learn more about the surgical methods used to treat professional athletes who have Morton’s neuromas, please contact a podiatrist or licensed foot surgeon.

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